How To Read A Knitting Pattern: Substituting Yarn Fiber and Weight

To continue our discussion from last week’s post on How To Read a Knitting Pattern – Size, Measurements, and Ease, let’s talk about yarn!

It’s the key ingredient in your recipe – make sure you choose it carefully.

Your pattern may suggest a yarn choice for you, but let’s delve deeper into why it is suggested, and how a little extra knowledge can make a big difference.

Malabrigo Chunky - Polar MornChoosing Yarn: What Kind, How Thick, and How Much

Designers will give you the thickness and yardage of the yarn you need to use to make the garment.

They’ll also tell you the exact yarn they used in the pattern photograph.

WARNING: The exact yarn used in the pattern is not always the best yarn to make your project out of.

Why? A few reasons. First, yarn companies often provide yarn for free to designers publishing projects in magazines, thereby limiting the designers’ choices.

Louisa Harding Ribbon YarnAlso, the magazine itself will often dictate the exact yarn that must be used. This means the designer often does not have a choice about the yarn used.

Instead, they will probably make they garment for themselves later in their favorite yarn – one that may be prettier, softer, and even more suited to the pattern.

More suited to the pattern?

What do you mean? Okay – here is your crash course in selecting yarns.

My complete knitting course, “Become a Knitting Superstar!” contains a full description of how to chose the right yarn for your project, and teaches you about substituting yarn if you need to do so.

But basically: choose your yarn according to the desired look and function of the finished project.

Gossamer CollarFor example, some garments are meant to have structure (eg. socks).

Some are meant to be ethereal and light (eg. lace shawls).

Some projects look best with a shiny, bright yarn (think silk gloves).

Some look best in a rugged tweed (like a peacoat).

Some should be able to be washed repeatedly (like dishcloths).

If you use the wrong kind of yarn (and by that I mean the wrong fiber content or blend) your socks will come out saggy, your dishcloths will shrink, and your arm warmers will be itchy.

Choose Yarns For Structure, Softness, and Durability:

If you want your garment to be:

  • Structured
  • Drapey
  • Washable
  • Shiny
  • Soft/not itchy
  • Warm
  • Fuzzy

Then chose a yarn with lots of:

  • Wool
  • Silk
  • Cotton or machine-wash wool
  • Silk
  • Merino wool
  • Alpaca
  • Angora or mohair

Pick The Right Thickness: Understanding Yarn Weight

The thickness of the yarn you choose is called its weight, and will be specified in the pattern. From thinnest to thickest, yarn weights are called:

Yarn Weights and Thicknesses
Yarn Weights and Thicknesses (click to enlarge)
  • Lace
  • Fingering/Sock
  • Sport
  • DK
  • Worsted
  • Aran
  • Bulky
  • Super-Bulky

 

Make Sure You Buy Enough Yarn: Understanding Yardage

Lastly, the designer will specify how much yarn you need for each size.

Again using parentheses, it will look like this: 1895(2045,2200) yards.

For large projects, I recommend buying an extra ball or skein of yarn. You can always return it if you don’t use it. Running out of yarn really sucks.

Related Articles

If you liked this article on understanding and substituting yarns, let me know by leaving a comment!

About Liat Gat - Founder

Liat is the founder and video knitting expert at KNITFreedom. If you liked this article, you'll love the tips you learn from her FREE video newsletter. Get it now by subscribing here.
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5 Responses to How To Read A Knitting Pattern: Substituting Yarn Fiber and Weight

  1. Sue says:

    Hi Liat,
    Good info for me, being new to picking out yarn specific to projects. Thanks.

  2. Patricia Girolami says:

    I love your site, I am a lacemaker, needle, and recently had eye problems and could not work my lace. I returned, after many years, to knitting, wow what a change and what an exciting new world I have discovered. Thankyou Liat for sharing all your wonderful information and technique. Tricia Girolami, Italy.

  3. Renna says:

    I would have been THRILLED to have found an article like this in my early days of knitting (not that I didn’t still find this helpful!). I was so clueless back then, and I didn’t have an LYS. I love your non-confusing way of teaching (sharing your knowledge)! :-)

  4. Pingback: Briar Rose Vintage KAL: Yarn and supplies | By Gum, By Golly

  5. Judy says:

    I have been knitting and crocheting for many years. Made my first sweater at age 10.
    I am now 74 years young. I am a caregiver for my DH, and am so happy to have this site to learn new things. We never stop learning.
    Liat, you are a wonderful teacher, and I feel honored to have your expertise right in my home. Thank you for all you do. Judy

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