“But honey, you LIKE doing the dishes!”

Happy housewife doing dishes The first time my boyfriend said this to me I stared him down like a jungle cat narrowing in for the kill.

Misguided man-notions aside, why not make something you do anyway more enjoyable through knitting?

I’ve got two great easy projects for you that could revolve around doing dishes, if you so choose: the ubiquitous-for-a-good-reason Granny’s Favorite Dishcloth, and the technique of crocheting a border around it or around anything else.

These two exercises will improve your all-around knitting and pattern-reading skills, whether you choose to make the dishcloth for yourself or give it as a gift… maybe to a deserving boyfriend.

Great Beginner Pattern: Granny’s Favorite Dishcloth

basic knitted dishclothThis is a great pattern for beginners: after a basic garter-stitch scarf, this is the perfect next step for someone who has just learned how to knit.

For help with reading the pattern and understanding the abbreviations, please download the video knitting dictionary.

This is a traditional pattern whose designer is unknown. Here is a link to the pattern on Ravelry.

Materials: Sugar and Cream cotton yarn, US size 6 or 7 straight needles

Pattern Instructions:

Knitted Dishcloth with Handmade Soap CO 4 sts.
Row 1: K4.
Row 2: K2, YO, knit across row.
Repeat last row until you have 44 sts on the needle.
Next: K1, k2tog, YO, k2tog, k to end.
Repeat last row until you have 4 sts on the needle.
Bind off and either leave as-is or add one round of single crochet to the edge, making a loop of chain stitches in one corner to hang the cloth up when you are finished using it (see below).

Adding a Simple Crochet Border

And speaking of how to do a round of single crochet around your dishcloth, look no further!

Even if you don’t know how to crochet, you can do this, because I show you every step.

Video Thumbnail

KNITFreedom – How To Add A Crochet Border To Knitting – Single Crochet Edging

Related Tutorials:

If you liked this tutorial on how to add a crochet border to knitting, post in the comments!

 

30 thoughts on “Knitted Dishcloth Pattern and How To Add a Single Crochet Border Onto Your Knitting”

  1. LOVE this dishcloth, and I did use it to help a friend learn how to knit. Glad you posted the instructions. I think it should be in everyone’s repertoire. Combine hobby with something practical. Plus it is great mindless knitting while reading subtitles in your fave foreign language shows/movies.

    1. Catherine, that’s wonderful! I’m so glad you used it to teach a friend to knit! I made a bunch when I learned to knit, and I think they are a great project. You learn solid beginner skills and make something practical!

  2. I love learning something new each day, and this was new to me. I can crochet a little (know how to chain and do basic stitches), but I did not know how to do this. Thank you for sharing!

  3. Thanks for this video! I was very nervous about messing up my sweater but you make it look so easy. I going to get started now…

  4. ON KNIT FREEDOM .COM YOU HAVE THAT NICE KNITTTED IDSHCLOTH AND EASY DIRECTIONS BUT IM NOT VERY GOOD AT KNTTING WOULD YOU OR ANYONE YOU KNOW HAVE DIRECTIONS FOR THAT SAME PATTERN BUT DIRECTIONS IN CROCHETED TERMS THANKS EMAIL ME AT SWMORSEL@AOL.COM

  5. Liat, I absolutely love your tutorials. I’ve just finished the dishcloth project in the Intermediate Scarves ebook and can’t wait to try the patterns for the frog, etc. Next week we’ll be making a 11-hr. drive to Sharbot Lake in Canada with 3 grandkids in the car. I started one of the girls (10 years old) off with this easy pattern this past week and hope to get a another one “hooked” during the trip. It will be one of my fall-back fun-things-to-do if we have a rainy day while we’re at the lake. :-) Thanks again for making learning how to knit so easy.

    1. Yaaaaaaaaay! You are my perfect student – I wrote Intermediate Scarves just for students like you. I’m so glad you found it and that it’s right up your alley! Have a great trip and stay in touch!

  6. I would love the crochet tutorial for the knitted dishcloth. This one looks super simple
    and they are great to use. I love them !

  7. Hello Liat, I have a question about a crocheting abbreviation I’m not sure of. Can you tell me what (5 sk chs count as first dc, ch 1, sk 2 chs), [sk each of next 4 chs, fan st in next ch] means. I thought sk meant skip but it dosen’t seen right to do it here? Thanks Liat

    1. Hi Shelia, I have no idea! I have never heard of that abbreviation before. I think it means “skip,” but you should post in a crochet forum on Ravelry and the members there will be able to help you for sure. :)

  8. Hello I have been knitting for many years and I would like to thank you for teaching me the crocheting a border around the dish cloths.
    thank you
    Reta

    1. Hi Louise! I just haven’t written a blog post in a long time because I’ve been so busy designing the new website. I hope to be able to start up with the weekly e-mails again soon. Thanks for being such a lovely, loyal reader. Hugs!

  9. My daughter wanted to learn to knit. I started knitting just to help her when she has problems. I now like it more than her! I have tried several dish cloths and they all look like a kite not a square. My knitting is tighter when I start but loosens up as i get to the end. Is there anyway to tighten the stitches when i notice this or i just need more experience keeping constant tension?

    Thanks for any advice,

    Knitting Dad

  10. hi!,I love your writing very a lot! share we keep in touch more
    approximately your article on AOL? I need an expert in this house to
    unravel my problem. May be that’s you! Having a look forward to peer you.

  11. Hello Liat I love knitting & crocheting I joined your site to see if you could help me to be come a faster knitter as I have been doing this for years now & still no faster,I have arthritis all over so I hope you can help me to improve thank you for your enjoyable classes.

  12. I am a pretty seasoned knitter, but I have never slipped that first stitch. I prefer the look however, I see that you do not recommend slipping that stitch using garter stitch. Isn’t the dishcloth garter stitch?

    I also like using a reverse crochet stitch on necklines although it has been years since I have done this!

    1. Hi Judi,

      Good point! I have actually since revised my position on slipping the first stitch on garter stitch (and I’ve been remiss in updating my blog about it).

      Now I recommend slipping the first stitch purlwise with yarn in front before moving the yarn to the back and knitting across the row.

  13. Dear Liat
    I am a new knitter and crocheter …thankyou for all your free patterns.. please keep posting more as I find your explaination very clear

    Have a wonderful Christmas and a great year ahead

  14. You say instead of binding off, you can crochet the edging, but you don’t say or show how to involve or do it with the four live knit stitches that are left, and maybe it’s my Topamax fogging my brain, but I just can’t figure out anything other than a chain stitch with those, not a single crochet. I know it will probably be a duh moment once I see it, and I can probably look it up on YouTube, but I’m in the Beginner Superstar, and it feels odd to be looking something up somewhere else.

    Though I can, of course. And do refer to my Knitty Answer book from time to time, I have a Crochet Answer one around somewhere that possibly might answer this, not sure.

    But since you recommend it, I felt left hang with, how do I do that?

  15. I’m just going to bind off, cut it, and then do the border, because I can’t figure it out, it’s like you just leap forward since it’s just an optional thing anyway.

    1. Hi Sara,
      I’m really sorry for the confusion. Yes, you’re supposed to bind off the 4 remaining stitches and then add the crochet border if desired. I’ve updated the blog post to reflect the correct instructions. Thank you!

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